Risk Rap

Rapping About a World at Risk

Big Data for a Small World: SMEIoT

smeiotIoT

The world is a great big database and algorithmic wizards and mad data scientists are burning the midnight oil to mine the perplexing infinities of ubiquitous data points.  Their goal is to put data to use to facilitate better governance, initiate pinpoint marketing campaigns, pursue revelatory academic research and improve the quality of service public agencies deliver to protect and serve communities. The convergence of Big Data, Cloud Computing and the Internet of Things (IoT) make this possible.

The earth is the mother of all relational databases.  It’s six billion inhabitants track many billions of real time digital footprints across the face of the globe each and every day.  Some footprints are readily apparent and easy to see.  Facebook likes, credit card transactions, name and address lists, urgent Tweets and public records sparkle like alluvial diamonds; all easily plucked by data aggregators and sold to product marketers at astonishing profit margins.  Other data points are less apparent, hidden or derived in the incessant hum of the ever listening, ever recording global cybersphere.   These are the digital touch points we knowingly and unknowingly create with our interactions with the world wide web and the machines that live there.

It is estimated that there is over 20 billion smart machines that are fully integrated into our lives.  These machines stay busy creating digital footprints; adding quantitative context to the quality of the human condition.  EZ Passes, RFID tags, cell phone records, location tracking, energy meters, odometers, auto dashboard idiot lights, self diagnostic fault tolerant machines, industrial process controls, seismographic, air and water quality apparatuses and the streaming CBOT digital blips flash the milliseconds of a day in the life of John Q. Public.  Most sentient beings pay little notice, failing to consider that someone somewhere is planting the imprints of our daily lives in mammoth disk farms.  The webmasters, data engineers and information scientists are collecting, collating, aggregating, scoring and analyzing these rich gardens of data to harvest an accurate psychographic portrait of modernity.

The IoT is the term coined to describe the new digital landscape we inhabit.  The ubiquitous nature of the internet, the continued rationalization of the digital economy into the fabric of society and the absolute dependency of daily life upon it, require deep consideration how it impacts civil liberties, governance, cultural vibrancy and economic well being.

The IoT is the next step in the development of the digital economy. By 2025 it is estimated that IoT will drive $6 Trillion in global economic activity.  This anoints data and information as the loam of the modern global economy; no less significant than the arrival of discrete manufacturing at the dawn of industrial capitalism.

The time may come when a case may be made that user generated data is a commodity and should be considered a public domain natural resource; but today it is the province of digirati  shamans entrusted to interpret the Rosetta Stones, gleaning deep understanding of the current reality while deriving high probability predictive futures.  IoT is one of the prevailing drivers of global social development.


SME

There is another critical economic and socio-political driver of the global economy.  Small Mid-Sized Enterprises (SME) are the cornerstone of job creation in developed economies.  They form the bedrock of subsistence and economic activity in lesser developed countries (LDC).  They are the dynamic element of capitalism.  SME led by courageous risk takers are the spearhead of capital formation initiatives.  Politicians, bureaucrats and business pundits extol their entrepreneurial zeal and hope to channel their youthful energy in service to local and national political aspirations.  The establishment of SME is a critical macroeconomic indicator of a country’s economic health and the wellspring of social wealth creation.

The World Bank/ IFC estimates that over 130 million registered SME inhabit the global economy. The definition of an SME varies by country. Generally an SME and MSME (Micro Small Mid Sized Enterprises)  are defined by two measures, number of employees or annual sales.  Micro enterprises are defined as employing less than 9 employees, small up to 100 employees and medium sized enterprises anywhere from 200 to 500 employees.  Defining SMEs by sales scale in a similar fashion.

Every year millions of startup businesses replace the millions that have closed.  The world’s largest economy United States boasts over 30 million SME and every year over one million  small businesses close.  The EU and OECD countries report similar statistics of the preponderance of SME and numbers of business closures.

The SME is a dynamic non homogeneous business segment.  It is highly diverse in character, culture and business model heavily colored by local influence and custom. SME is overly sensitive to macroeconomic risk factors and market cyclicality.  Risk is magnified in the SME franchise due to high concentration of risk factors.  Over reliance on a limited set of key clients or suppliers, product obsolescence, competitive pressures, force majeure events, key employee risk, change management and credit channel dependencies are glaring risk factors magnified by business scale and market geographics.

In the United States, during the banking crisis the Federal Reserve was criticized for pursuing policies that favored large banking and capital market participants while largely ignoring SME. To mitigate contagion risk, The Federal Reserve  quickly acted to pump liquidity into the banking sector to buttress the capital structure of SIFI (Systemically Important Financial Institutions). It was thought that a collateral benefit would be the stimulation of SME lending.  This never occurred as SBA backed loans nosedived. Former Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner implemented the TARP and TALF programs to further strengthen the capital base of distressed banks as former Fed Chairman  Ben Bernanke pursued Quantitative Easing to transfer troubled mortgage backed securities onto Uncle Sams balance sheet to relieve financial institutions  of these troubled assets. Some may argue that President Obama’s The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA)  helped the SME sector.  The $800 billion stimulus was one third tax cuts, one third cash infusion to local governments and one third capital expenditures aimed at shovel ready infrastructure improvement projects.  The scale of the ARRA was miniscule as compared to support rendered to banks and did little to halt the deteriorating macroeconomic conditions of the collapsing housing market, ballooning unemployment and rising energy prices severely stressing SME.

The EU offered no better.  As the PIGS (Portugal, Ireland, Greece, Spain) economies collapsed the European Central Bank forced draconian austerity measures on national government expenditures undermining key SME market sensitivities.  On both sides of the Atlantic, the perception of a bifurcated central banking policy that favored TBTF Wall Street over the needs of  an atomized SME segment flourished.  The wedge between the speculative economy of Wall Street and the real economy on Main Street remains a festering wound.

In contrast to the approach of western central bankers, Asian Tigers, particularly Singapore have created a highly  supportive environment for the incubation and development of SME. Banks offer comprehensive portfolios of financial products and SME advisory services. Government legislative programs highlight incubation initiatives linked to specific industry sectors. Developed economies have much to learn from these SME friendly market leaders.

The pressing issues concerning net neutrality, ecommerce tax policies, climate change and the recognition of Bitcoin as a valid commercial specie are critical developments that goes to the heart of a healthy global SME community.  These emerging market events are benevolent business drivers for SME and concern grows that legislative initiatives are being drafted to codify advantages for politically connected larger enterprises.

Many view this as a manifestation of a broken political system, rife with protections of large well financed politically connected institutions. Undermining these entrenched corporate interests is the ascending digital paradigm promising to dramatically alter business as usual politics. Witness the role of social media in the Arab Spring, Barack Obama’s 2008 election or the decapitalization of the print media industry as clear signals of the the passing away of the old order of things.  Social networking technologies and the democratization of information breaks down the ossified monopolies of knowledge access. These archaic ramparts are being gleefully overthrown by open collaborative initiatives levelling the playing field for all market participants.

SMEIoT

This is where SMEIoT neatly converges.  To effectively serve an efficient market, transparency and a contextual understanding of its innate dynamics are critical preconditions to market participation.  The incubation of SME and the underwriting of capital formation initiatives from a myriad of providers will occur as information standards provide a level of transparency that optimally aligns risk and investment capital. SMEIoT will provide the insights to the sector for SME to grow and prosper while industry service providers engage SME within the context of a cooperative economic non-exploitative relationship.

This series will examine SME and how IoT will serve to transform and incubate the sector.  We’ll examine the typology of the SME ecosystem, its risk characteristics and features.  We’ll propose a metadata framework to model SME descriptors, attributes, risk factors and a scoring methodology.  We’ll propose an SME portal, review the mission of Big Data and its indispensable role to create cooperative economic frameworks within the SME ecosystem. Lastly we’ll review groundbreaking work social scientists, legal scholars and digital frontier activists are proposing to address best governance practices and ethical considerations of Big Data collection, the protection of privacy rights,  informed consent, proprietary content and standards of accountability.

SMEIoT coalesces at the intersection of social science, commerce and technology.  History has aligned SMEIot building blocks to create the conditions for this exciting convergence.  Wide participation of government agencies, academicians, business leaders, scientists and ethicists will be required to make pursuit of  this science serve the greatest good.

 

This is the first in a series of articles on Big Data and SMEIoT . It originally appeared in Daftblogger eJournal. Next piece in series is scheduled to appear on Daftblogger eJournal within the next two weeks.

#smeiot #metasme #sum2llc #sme #office365 #mobileoffice #TARP #capitalformation #IoT #internetofthings #OECD #TBTF #Bitcoin #psychographics #smeportals #bigdata #informedconsent

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July 9, 2014 Posted by | banking, Bernanke, commerce, commercial, credit crisis, economics, ethics, Internet of Things, IoT, politics, risk management, SME, SMEIOT, Sum2, sustainability, TALF, TARP, Treasury | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bernanke Bonds, Paulson Puts & Cox Calls

Marx made a wry observation in the opening lines to one of his historical tomes, “Men make their own history, but they do not make it as they please; they do not make it under self-selected circumstances, but under circumstances existing already, given and transmitted from the past. The tradition of all dead generations weighs like an nightmare on the brains of the living.”

So it is with us. We are experiencing a crisis that is the result of a decades long deconstruction of the United States economic, political and cultural infrastructure. It began with the dismantling of our manufacturing base. It continued with the transformation of our capital markets. The purpose of the stock markets was to facilitate capital formation for the creation of businesses and industries. Today the markets function principally for speculative investment and the enrichment purposes of monied interests. Our deconstruction accelerated with extreme political Rovian partisanship and the fear mongering and self serving righteous divisiveness incessantly screamed by the howling yodelers of Talk Radio. Finally our enlightened republic is threatened with extinction by the intentional dismantling of our public education system and the virulent attack on secular learning and civic participation.

During times like these weird things begin to happen. We need to be prepared for anything and everything. That said it is heartening to see the Fed, Treasury and SEC act with such dispatch to address the US role in the global banking crisis. An economic meltdown serves no one. The long term impact of these swift concerted actions will be profound. Undoubtedly these actions will add to the national debt. Some think it unfair to assign this burden onto the backs of future generations. Indeed this country started a revolution on the idea that taxation without representation is an intolerable injustice that cannot stand. Years from now the yet to be born will curse the long dead for their poor stewardship of our national wealth and resources and how it contributed to an extreme and unfair taxation they are forced to pay. That is of course if America does make good on its debt. Alexander Hamilton may be stirring in his grave. So this is a time out from the heat of a global market implosion. What is happening?

PROHIBITION ON SHORT SELLING: Shorting can now be considered a criminal enterprise. At present it only applies to large financial services firms. Lots of firms are clamoring to get on the you can’t short my stock list.

The new national slogan from the SEC should be “GO LONG ON AMERICA!”

REPO MAN:Global Repo Desk was created to facilitate liquidity amongst the global central banking system. London, Tokyo, Frankfurt and the other G8 central bankers are all counter parties to Bernanke’s $180 B liquidity infusion. Paulson’s putting on his old Goldman Sach’s trading cap and promises to trade us out of this bad position.

The Feds new slogan, “NO CENTRAL BANKER LEFT BEHIND!”

GOOD BANK / BAD BANK:Bernanke is using his infinite balance sheet to segregate all the bad debt from the good stuff. Its kind of like what ENRON did as it packaged all its poor debt obligations and parked them in offshore SIVs. Maybe it will work this time because unlike ENRON the Fed can print money. Lots of it.

New Slogan “BERNANKE AND PAULSON, SMARTEST GUYS IN THE ROOM.”

CORPORATE BAILOUTS: The US taxpayer is now the owner of the worlds largest insurance company. It’s $80 B capital infusion in AIG will keep this company solvent for the time being and keep the credit rating agencies from lowering AIG’s credit condition to junk. Cox has requested a copy of Lloyds of London Names List.

New Slogan: “PRAY FOR NO MORE HURRICANES, WE CAN”T AFFORD TO PAY OFF THE CLAIMS”

SHOTGUN WEDDINGS: First it was Bear Stearns and JP. Now its Merrill and B of A. Who’s next?

New Slogan: “WE DO MORE MARRIAGES THEN ELVIS AT A LAS VEGAS DRIVE THROUGH”

INFINITE BALANCE SHEET: That is what they keep saying. The Fed can do these financial gymnastics do to its access to an infinite balance sheet that can finally match infinite assets to cover infinite liabilities. Sounds like a tall order to me but i must admit it sounds pretty good from where I’m sitting today. Don’t know how it will go down with the future generations. From Bernanke’s lips to Gods ear.

New Slogan: “INFINITY, ITS MORE THEN ENOUGH TO GET IT DONE”

Bailout politics will sure to become a bloodsport. Every once in awhile you see the commentators on CNBC smugly ask about a threat to free markets and contemplating about the evolving form of capitalism. I can also hear Palin’s squeaking voice proclaiming she’s ready and offer some sage advise concerning our current plight. Palin would say that if she were so blessed to take the oath of office with her fellow Maverick John McCain, she would immediately put AIG up for sale on e-bay and return the proceeds of the sale to the American taxpayers.

Music: Temptations, Ball of Confusion

Risk: economy, market, future generations

September 19, 2008 Posted by | banking, Bernanke, Bush, Cox, credit crisis, Paulson, pop, TARP | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Anecdotal Evidence: Real Estate Market Rebounds!

My neighbor Hank has had his home on the market since the fall. He retired years ago and spent a good portion of his time attending to the care and maintenance of his beloved home that he has shared with his wife Judy for over 40 years. Last summer he decided it was time to move to an assisted living community. He bought a home in a senior community down by the Jersey Shore and put his place up for sale.

He just missed the real estate market peak in early 2007. He hung on to his beloved place a year too long. Soon after putting his home on the market the sub-prime mortgage meltdown hit and as the contagion spread through the credit markets Hank couldn’t get anyone to come to see his nice home. Over 6 or 7 months numerous open houses and a couple of St. Joseph statues buried around the property he had one offer that fell through because the buyer couldn’t get a mortgage. Hank now has two homes; one at the senior community with a new mortgage and his beloved home of 40 years which he could not sell. As a guy on a fixed income Hank was and still is in a pickle.

Yesterday I was doing the spring cleaning outside; getting the grass, garden and gutters ready for the summer. A real estate agent pulled up with an open house sign. She planted it into Hanks perfect lawn and entered the house. I said yeah, good luck. My skepticism soon turned to joy for Hank as car after car parked outside and went for the tour. He must have had 20 visitors. I would greet everyone with a smile, a wave and a cheery hello to try to do my part to help Hank sell his home.

Either the St. Joseph statues are working or maybe Bernanke’s interest rate cuts are adding a little liquidity to the credit markets. Hopefully this is going on across the country and hopefully things will get unstuck in the real estate market.

We’ll keep you posted on the state of the housing market from our little corner of the world and our business development plans to consider marketing St. Joseph statues.

You Tube Video: The Beatles, Fixin a Hole

Risk: credit; senior citizens; mortgages; real estate; fixed income

April 21, 2008 Posted by | Bernanke, community, credit crisis, pop, real estate | , , , , | Leave a comment

Minus 80,000 for March!

Maybe Mr. Bernanke will say the R word today.

It really doesn’t matter. What’s called for is how to get the economy back on track. Policy makers and market participants must come up with some creative solutions to address the new economic realities confronting our nation.

One thing is certain. Any governmental recovery program must squarely address the support of small mid-size enterprises (SMEs). SMEs are the principal drivers of job and wealth creation and economic development. This is a segment that must be viewed as too big to fail. And policy and programs must be at the forefront of any recovery package under consideration by our elected officials.

An interesting article by MR Pridiyathorn Devakula on government policy and support of SME financing provides some valuable clues to guide our policy. Writing for The Nation he outlines the inefficiencies of the SME State Bank as the appropriate credit channel to fund the development and support of SMEs. The interesting point he makes is that commercial banking sector is a more efficient credit channel.

There are many interesting corollaries with how the US banking and credit channel market is evolving.

We will explore them in more detail in future posts.

Cheers,

Risk Rapper

April 5, 2008 Posted by | Bernanke, recession, SME | Leave a comment

The "R" Word and the Power of Semantics

Well he finally almost said it. Fed Head Bernanke hinted at the “R” word.

“Recession is possible” he said. “Our actions appear to have stabilized the situation in the markets somewhat, but markets remain under considerable stress.”

Now don’t you feel better? I do. But my level of warmth and fuzziness would be enhanced if his declarative statements on our current political economic condition weren’t clouded in such existential nuance.

Words like “possible”, “appear to”, “somewhat” gives me the feeling he’s hedging his words. Evidently he takes his role as the nation’s supreme fiduciary seriously. He will stop at nothing to protect Jim Cramer’s innocent day traders as they madly thumb the volume button on TV clickers while they eagerly finger the enter key on their E-Trade accounts.

You are allowed to say the “R” word Mr. Bernanke. Just because you say it, don’t make it so. You are a powerful man no doubt. You must adhere to restrictions as to what you say particularly during times of acute precariousness of the capital and credit markets. But great leaders take a stand. They articulate a vision and make known a course of action that your constituents (tax payers’ aka free citizens) can understand and believe so as they can prepare to take the action to protect themselves, their assets and liberties during times of great national duress.

Let me say that the “R” word is being spoken on Main Street. Particularly in neighborhoods surrounding Detroit where I understand the moral hazard casualty list is excessively high and continues to mount.

Say the “R” word Mr. Bernanke. It would be a refreshing departure from the “don’t ask, don’t tell”mantra that guides the American psyche deep into denial and an administration that is mired in a Pollyannaish view of its self created reality.

People do tend to blame the messenger. I guess it’s the association and connection with the awareness of a pending or present malady that requires considered action to mitigate. That’s not a bad thing. That is a good thing and is what effective risk managers do. They honestly assess risk factors and take earnest action to adapt to fluid situations. And by doing so, risk managers triumphantly overcome the pressing challenge by transforming it into an opportunity.

This is your opportunity Mr. Bernanke.

God speed on your endeavor.

Risk Rapper

April 4, 2008 Posted by | Bernanke, recession | Leave a comment