Risk Rap

Rapping About a World at Risk

Blog Action Day: The Power of We

 We the People, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.  Thus begins some of the opening words to the constitution of the first constitutional republic of the modern world.

Seems fair, simple and plainly spoken.  We the people ordain a constitution, a social compact, consenting to be governed in the expectant hope that domestic tranquility and the blessings of liberty for all living and future citizens will be respected and protected.  It was a revolutionary notion for its time and is still the ideal democratic republics aspire to realize and practice.  It is an idea that moves masses of people throughout the world to come together, demonstrating the collective strength of the “power of we”.  It’s very notion sets people in motion to force intractable power elites whose rule is based on custom and the vanity of tyranny to cede authority to the democratic impulses of a people’s fight for the consent to be governed.

Last years Arab Spring demonstrated that the democratic aspirations of people remain alive.  It took a massive movement of people, willingly sacrificing life and limb and the safety of loved ones to dispose of dictators and their self serving regimes.  The fall of Hosni Mubarak in Egypt and Muammar Gaddafi in Libya were startling events in the rapidity of their downfall; and as an emblematic revelation of the fragility of tyrannical rule.  It also born hope in the hearts of people living under unelected rulers that change could happen if the “power of we” was focused on the task of disposing a regime whose sole goal was self enrichment and the perpetuation of its rule.  As the conflict in Syria grinds on, the world witnesses the awful cost of the struggle against tyranny. It’s a damning condemnation of Bashar al-Assad’s vanity of power and a moving example of the price human beings are willing to pay to realize the blessings of liberty that  many citizens living in western democracies too often take for granted.

As the United States contentious presidential election comes to a close, I hope that my fellow citizens understand the dear price people are paying to have some semblance of a representative democracy.  I also hope my fellow citizens realize that the duopoly of power exercised by the ruling democratic and republican parties represent economic and political interests that run counter to the interests of the vast majority of We the People.  I hope my fellow citizens understand that the two ruling parties are a class of political elites that have governed to serve the perpetuation of their rule,  financed by an embedded plutocracy that continues to enrich itself with the complicit enabling of democratic and republican party officials.

In this election cycle, my fondest hope for America is for my fellow citizens to break the stranglehold of self serving two party rule.  We must begin to adopt the ideas of progressive third party candidates, like The Green Party.  We must elect candidates that are free from the bought shackles of favoritism and patronage. Thus remaining free to pursue a moral and ethical conscience that advocates liberty, equality of opportunity and civil rights for all citizens.  We must also prepare to engage a political movement that goes beyond the ballot box, becoming activist citizens to win a future that promotes the ecology of a balanced sustainable path of growth, peace and prosperity for all.

 risk: politics, economics, environment

 Music Selection: John Lennon, Power to the People

Blog Action Day Post: The Power of We

October 16, 2012 Posted by | Civil Rights, democracy, government, republicans, social unrest | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Davos Dithers While Cairo Burns

Per-Gynt-in-the-Hall-of-the-Mountain-King-Dovregubbens-Hall-1913_WEBB

In the pristine air of the Swiss Alps,  the worlds power elites gather at an annual World Economic Forum in Davos Switzerland.   In this rarefied Hall of the Mountain King’s, Prime Ministers, CEOs and the esteemed emissaries of the global elite get some valuable face-time with each other to assess the world situation and figure out ways to arrange it more to their likeness.   Russian Prime Minister Medvedev  was scheduled to give the welcoming address but had to cancel because a Chechen suicide bomber blew himself up in Moscow’s busiest airport taking a couple dozen travelers with him.

Busy looking inward to protect personal interests,  the fiduciaries of global solvency stew about regulatory overreach and the added burden it creates as the ruling elites balance the demands of worldly subsistence with the perplexities of generating sufficient cash flows to cover dividend payments to shareholders.  More often than not the heft of shareholder concerns outweighs the growing immiseration of the world’s troubled masses.  The deeply held sacred dogma that enlarged prosperity for the wealthy benefits the disenfranchised is being increasingly challenged as the wealth gap rises against a backdrop of growing economic duress and political instability.

The growing movement to topple Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak illustrates the failure of a global trickle down political economy.  Mubarak has held office since Anwar Sadat’s unceremonious removal from office  is receiving urgent signals from the Egyptians that he has clearly overstayed his welcome.  For three decades, Mr. Mubarak and his military caliphate have been the recipients of generous western aid packages designed to maintain a tenuous peace with Israel.  Stitched together at Camp David in the closing days of the Carter Administration; the sibling rivalry between Abraham’s jealous children remains incendiary and its stability will be tenuous at best considering the growing role of  The Muslim Brotherhood in challenging Mubarak’s continued rule.

The United States sends Egypt $1.5 billion in military aid each year.  Its seem a small price to pay to guarantee the peace with Zion and to  underwrite a strategic ally in the volatile Arab world.  It’s also a perfect political foil to counterbalance Israel’s favored nation status.   But US aid and IMF loans have financed Mubarak’s autocracy creating deep political fissures within Egypt.  These aid programs have widened the wealth gap by limiting opportunity to a select few; abetted political disenfranchisement that encouraged social unrest,  fueling Islamic radicalism and the urgent need for democratic reforms.

The game plan followed in Egypt for the past three decades is not working.  The nature of western aid to Egypt and how it was used to benefit the military ruling elites illustrate the conundrum of the Davos Hajiis.   Aligning economic development and political empowerment of the world’s disenfranchised with the needs of the global capitalist elites has failed to deliver on its promise.  The pursuit of Mule and  Sparrow economics have engorged the elites and left the many sparrows emaciated.

When the Davos delegates leave their ski chateaus for an afternoon on the slopes, as they exit the lifts at the top of the world, it may yet still be possible to glimpse the growing crowds amassing in Tahrir Square.  It may still be possible to connect the dots of promoting the inclusive economics of reciprocity and social democracy.  The revolutionaries gathering in Liberation Square  are joining with the dispossessed to give full voice for an agenda of change.

The elites have stored up too much wealth for themselves.  The masses have remained wanting, impoverished of goods and denied liberty, fed a steady diet of repression they stoke fires in Tahrir Square signaling the time for change has arrived.

Music selection: Edvard Grieg: In the Hall of the Mountain Kings

Risk: Middle East, political stability, economic prosperity, global economy, democracy, Egypt, Hosni Mubarak, Davos, IMF, Israel, Tahrir Square, revolution, military rule, Jimmy Carter, Mule and Sparrow Economics, Camp David Accords, Medvedev, Anwar Sadat, World Economic Forum

 

 

 

January 30, 2011 Posted by | banking, corporate social responsibility, credit crisis, democracy, Egypt, history, Israel, Middle East, military, Muslim, politics, revolution, social unrest, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment