Risk Rap

Rapping About a World at Risk

A Borrower and Lender Be: SME Lending

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Bankers are catching some major heat. Senators are screaming at the money lenders in an effort to have them explain what the banks did with the $350bn they gave them in the first round of TARP funding. Now that the second $350bn tranche of TARP funds is about to be dispersed, the politicians want assurances that a good portion of the money will find its way into the economy in loans to small & mid-sized enterprises (SME). All believe that this is critical to halt the specter of the deepening recession.

If it wasn’t so serious it would be funny. Banks are getting yelled at by the politicians for not lending. Angry constituents are beating up the politicians for giving the banks the bailout money in the the first place. They complain that the Treasury Department is giving banks taxpayer funds at a 1% interest rate that banks in turn lend back to taxpayers at interests rates that are considerably higher. To close this circle of pain, consumers are getting nasty calls from their bankers and debt collection agencies, threatening them with punitive actions if they don’t pay their mortgages and outstanding credit card balances. Everyone is a debtor in this comedic cycle of pain.

Now that banks are flush with cash from the second round of TARP funding they must start lending and SMEs need to start borrowing. Its that simple. What is not simple is breaking the stalemate of confidence that exists between lenders and borrowers. Risk aversion is extremely high. Banks are very concerned about adding credit risk exposures to commercial loan portfolios. A recession creates enormous market challenges for SMEs. Bankers need to develop an enhanced sense of confidence in the management and business prospects of an SME before it will extend credit.

Both lenders and borrowers can come together in a shared understanding if they are willing to engage in the deeper work that is required by the new business realities. SME managers must be aware of the business and risk management practices that bankers generally look for when assessing credit worthiness. SMEs must be able to demonstrate to lenders that they are committed to sound risk management and corporate governance practices. SMEs must also be prepared to meet transparency requirements of banks with honest and timely disclosures.

Bankers actively seek SMEs that are run by focused and capable managers. SMEs that can demonstrate effective risk management skills and an awareness of the challenges and opportunities present in their market will find that bankers are more then willing to extend new credit facilities to them. Bankers will have greater confidence in these SMEs if they understand and believe in the SME business model. Bankers lend with confidence when they understand how businesses can generate sufficient cash flow and profits to pay back loans. Bankers need confidence that credit risk is being mitigated. SMEs enhance banker confidence that they are a good credit risk by demonstrating a strong risk management and corporate governance culture.

Fortunately there is tool that bankers and SMEs use to build mutual understanding and trust. The Profit|Optimizer helps to generate the confidence needed to help banks lend capital and SME to effectively deploy it.

Get the Profit|Optimizer and confidently be a lender, be a borrower and break the cycle of pain to get our economy going again.

You Tube Video: Liza Minnelli, Joel Grey Cabaret, Money

Risk: credit, market, small business

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February 18, 2009 Posted by | banking, credit crisis, recession, SME | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Reinventing Community Banks

Community Banks have been profoundly affected by the current crisis in the credit markets. Many will need to reposition their market focus and adopt innovative growth strategies to build its capital base and sustain profitability if they wish to remain independent.

Community banks have confronted drastic market challenges in the not to distant past. During the 90’s community banks dominance of the small and mid-size enterprise (SME) market began to erode. The dynamics of the banking industry changed rapidly. Large money center and regional banks leveraged technology, operational and balance sheet scale to provide access to inexpensive credit products bundled with cash management tools. They were armed with huge marketing budgets and became adept at selling a growing array of transaction services that met the growing sophistication and business needs of the lucrative SME market. The current banking crisis forebodes yet another drastic alteration in the structure, regulatory and businesses practices of the industry. The current banking crisis will forever alter the face and scope of community banking sector.

The challenge for the community bank will to reinvent itself. Community banks must decide who its customers are and target the market with focused precision. Community banks need to recognize its strength by leveraging its natural geographic advantages and sell products into markets that transcend local limitations. Community banks need to offer products that help SMEs manage cash flow and liquidity, make informed decisions on capital allocation initiatives, decrease cost of capital and products that facilitates transactions and fosters new customer acquisition.

Community banks must also begin to farm new liquidity pools. Securing funding sources in a world of limited liquidity will be the greatest challenge for community banks. Overcoming regulatory hurdles notwithstanding, branding community banks as a consistent, trusted and efficient delivery channel of credit products is an important ingredient for its survival. The community bank must recognize how it adds value in a complex and expanding delivery chain. The failure to secure funding sources will only accelerate balance sheet erosion that results in merging with another institution or liquidation.

The community bank must assure its funding sources, equity holders and regulators that it truly knows and understands its customer’s market and growth potential. This KYC goes deeper then determining an acceptable FICO score, Federal ID verification and passing an OFAC screen. Employing risk management and opportunity discovery exercises with SME prospects and clients are principal business drivers that provide critical disclosure information to funding sources that address risk aversion concerns.

Funding sources and other stakeholders must be secure in the knowledge that the community banker understands the peculiar risk characteristics of the SME’s strategy, business model and governance and risk management acumen to provide investors and lenders exceptional returns on investment capital and lines of credit. The banker then becomes an effective risk manager whose vigilance and considered business judgment provides a fair return to funding sources, assures regulators that capital ratios remain strong and reward shareholders with appreciating equity valuations.

Community banks are just one of the many expanding choices an SME has to provide banking and financing services. Community banks must create a compelling brand identity and articulate a differentiated value proposition with focused product marketing to regain its market dominance with SMEs.

You Tube Video: The Beatles, Money

Risk: Credit, Market, Banking, Small Business, Recession, Marketing,

May 30, 2008 Posted by | banking, credit crisis, rock, SME | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment