Risk Rap

Rapping About a World at Risk

The Cost of Banking Goes Up

screamThe severity of the banking crisis is evident in the 95 banks the FDIC has closed during 2009. The inordinate amount of bank failures has placed a significant strain on the FDIC insurance fund. The FDIC insurance fund protects bank customers from losing their deposits when the FDIC closes an insolvent bank.

The depletion of the FDIC Insurance fund is accelerating at an alarming rate. At the close of the first quarter, the FDIC bank rescue fund had a balance of $13 billion. Since that time three major bank failures, BankUnited Financial Corp, Colonial BancGroup and Guaranty Financial Group depleted the fund by almost $11 billion. In addition to these three large failures over 50 banks have been closed during the past six months. Total assets in the fund are at its lowest level since the close of the S&L Crisis in 1992. Bank analysts research suggests that FDIC may require $100 billion from the insurance fund to cover the expense of an additional 150 to 200 bank failures they estimate will occur through 2013. This will require massive capital infusions into the FDIC insurance fund. The FDIC’s goal of maintaining confidence in functioning credit markets and a sound banking system may yet face its sternest test.

FDIC Chairwoman Sheila Bair is considering a number of options to recapitalize the fund. The US Treasury has a $100 billion line of credit available to the fund. Ms. Bair is also considering a special assessment on bank capital and may ask banks to prepay FDIC premiums through 2012. The prepay option would raise about $45 billion. The FDIC is also exploring capital infusions from foreign banking institutions, Sovereign Wealth Funds and traditional private equity channels.

Requiring banks to prepay its FDIC insurance premiums will drain economic capital from the industry. The removal of $45 billion dollars may not seem like a large amount but it is a considerable amount of capital that banks will need to withdraw from the credit markets with the prepay option. Think of the impact a targeted lending program of $45 billion to SME’s could achieve to incubate and restore economic growth. Sum2 advocates the establishment of an SME Development Bank to encourage capital formation for SMEs to achieve economic growth.

Adding stress to the industry, banks remain obligated to repay TARP funds they received when the program was enacted last year. To date only a fraction of TARP funds have been repaid. Banks also remain under enormous pressure to curtail overdraft, late payment fees and reduce usurious credit card interest rates. All these factors will place added pressures on banks financial performance. Though historic low interest rates and cost of capital will help to buttress bank profitability, high write offs for bad debt, lower fee income and decreased loan origination will test the patience of bank shareholders. Management will surely respond with a new pallet of transaction and penalty fees to maintain a positive P&L statement. Its like a double taxation for citizens. Consumers saddled with additional tax liabilities to maintain a solvent banking system will also face higher fees  charged y their banks so they can repay the loans extended by the US Treasury to assure a well functioning financial system for the benefit of the republic’s citizenry.

You Tube Music Video: The 5th Dimension, Up Up and Away

Risk: bank failures, regulatory, profitability, political, recession, economic recovery, SME

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September 30, 2009 Posted by | banking, business, commerce, economics, government, Hamilton Plan, private equity, regulatory, SME, sovereign wealth funds, TARP, Treasury | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Managing Pandemic Risk

pandemicThe Swine Flu outbreak carries with it the potential to severely damage the financial health of small and mid-size enterprises (SMEs). Left unmanaged pandemics can impair profits, generate losses, undermine the contribution of key employees, disrupt supply chains, halt operations and undermine an enterprises financial health that can ultimately lead to bankruptcy.

Though many consider pandemics as a force majeure risk event that lies beyond control, businesses can take steps to mitigate and manage the drastic challenges a pandemic can pose to a business. This is particularly important for businesses that find themselves in a weakened position due to the recession. Businesses that have become highly stressed due to the current business cycle are at acute risk of becoming insolvent due to the shock of this potentially catastrophic risk event. Business managers, bankers, shareholders and businesses with extended supply chains need to take steps to manage and mitigate the severe  effects of pandemic risk.

The first step is to create or update a business continuity plan. Business continuity plans need to address a range of issues that includes planning for disasters in general and planning for the unique challenges an influenza pandemic presents and integrate mitigation initiatives into critical business processes.

All businesses are unique. Addressing a pandemic risk event in your business plan will require you to conduct a risk-management assessment on all aspects of your operations, business processes and market impact to ensure continued operation and financial health of the enterprise.

Some things management must consider in its review are:

  • Assess how you work with employees, customers, contractors to minimize contagion threats
  • Determine mission critical business functions your business requires to maintain operations
  • Stress test your business operations to determine how to function with high absentee rates
  • Review inventories in case foreign or domestic suppliers and transport services are interrupted
  • Review supply chain links, determine at risk suppliers and identify backups
  • Reorganize work spaces to minimize the spread of the disease
  • Equip employees to support telecommuting
  • Develop communication strategies to update employees, customers and the media
  • Use this opportunity to expand e-commerce capabilities
  • Promote awareness of the problems associated with pandemic flu
  • Alert employees about what steps you’re taking and what they can do to limit the pandemic’s impact
  • Review sick-leave and pay policies to ensure they don’t discourage workers from staying home when they’re ill
  • Make backup plans if you need to pull people out of countries where the epidemic strikes
  • Develop a travel policy that restricts travel to areas where the virus is active
  • Stock up on masks and sanitizers, and consider staggering work hours to limit the size of gatherings

Sum2 publishes the Profit|Optimizer product series.  The Profit|Optimizer is the leading SME risk management platform that helps business managers and business stakeholders quickly assess enterprise risk factors and take considered action to mitigate and manage those risk factors. Sum2 will be releasing a pandemic risk assessment module by the close of this week.  The product will retail for $95.00 and will assist SME’s to assess, mitigate and manage the threats posed to their business by pandemics and other social disasters.

More information can be found on our website www.sum2.com.

Sum2 helps businesses assess risk and realize opportunities.

April 30, 2009 Posted by | business continuity, disaster planning, geography, operations, Profit|Optimizer, regulatory, risk management, Sum2, supply chain | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Borrower and Lender Be: SME Lending

shylock1

Bankers are catching some major heat. Senators are screaming at the money lenders in an effort to have them explain what the banks did with the $350bn they gave them in the first round of TARP funding. Now that the second $350bn tranche of TARP funds is about to be dispersed, the politicians want assurances that a good portion of the money will find its way into the economy in loans to small & mid-sized enterprises (SME). All believe that this is critical to halt the specter of the deepening recession.

If it wasn’t so serious it would be funny. Banks are getting yelled at by the politicians for not lending. Angry constituents are beating up the politicians for giving the banks the bailout money in the the first place. They complain that the Treasury Department is giving banks taxpayer funds at a 1% interest rate that banks in turn lend back to taxpayers at interests rates that are considerably higher. To close this circle of pain, consumers are getting nasty calls from their bankers and debt collection agencies, threatening them with punitive actions if they don’t pay their mortgages and outstanding credit card balances. Everyone is a debtor in this comedic cycle of pain.

Now that banks are flush with cash from the second round of TARP funding they must start lending and SMEs need to start borrowing. Its that simple. What is not simple is breaking the stalemate of confidence that exists between lenders and borrowers. Risk aversion is extremely high. Banks are very concerned about adding credit risk exposures to commercial loan portfolios. A recession creates enormous market challenges for SMEs. Bankers need to develop an enhanced sense of confidence in the management and business prospects of an SME before it will extend credit.

Both lenders and borrowers can come together in a shared understanding if they are willing to engage in the deeper work that is required by the new business realities. SME managers must be aware of the business and risk management practices that bankers generally look for when assessing credit worthiness. SMEs must be able to demonstrate to lenders that they are committed to sound risk management and corporate governance practices. SMEs must also be prepared to meet transparency requirements of banks with honest and timely disclosures.

Bankers actively seek SMEs that are run by focused and capable managers. SMEs that can demonstrate effective risk management skills and an awareness of the challenges and opportunities present in their market will find that bankers are more then willing to extend new credit facilities to them. Bankers will have greater confidence in these SMEs if they understand and believe in the SME business model. Bankers lend with confidence when they understand how businesses can generate sufficient cash flow and profits to pay back loans. Bankers need confidence that credit risk is being mitigated. SMEs enhance banker confidence that they are a good credit risk by demonstrating a strong risk management and corporate governance culture.

Fortunately there is tool that bankers and SMEs use to build mutual understanding and trust. The Profit|Optimizer helps to generate the confidence needed to help banks lend capital and SME to effectively deploy it.

Get the Profit|Optimizer and confidently be a lender, be a borrower and break the cycle of pain to get our economy going again.

You Tube Video: Liza Minnelli, Joel Grey Cabaret, Money

Risk: credit, market, small business

February 18, 2009 Posted by | banking, credit crisis, recession, SME | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Credit Redi Blog

Credit Redi is a company sponsored blog of Sum2. The purpose of Credit Redi is to help small and mid-size enterprises (SMEs) protect and improve their ability to access credit and equity financing from banks , shareholders and other funding sources.

Sum2 is dedicated to the commercial application of sound practices. Our sound practices program and products address:

  • corporate governance
  • risk management
  • stakeholder communications
  • regulatory compliance

Sum2 believes that all enterprises enhance their equity value by implementing a sound practice program. Sound practices are principal value drivers for corporate and product brands. Practitioners are awarded with healthy profit margins, attraction of high end clientele, enterprise risk mitigation and premium equity valuation.

Sum2 looks forward to helping you address the pressing challenges of the current business cycle.

You Tube Video: Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass, Work Song

Risk: abundance

January 28, 2009 Posted by | banking, credit, risk management, SME, Sum2 | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Economy Sheds 157,000 Jobs


Lost in the euphoria of Barack Obama’s electoral triumph is todays rude reminder of the the continued deterioration of the economy.  ADP published its monthly report on employment yesterday revealing that the US economy shed another 157,000 jobs during the month of October.

According to the report, “large businesses, defined as those with 500 or more workers, saw employment decline 41,000, while medium-size companies with between 50 and 499 workers declined 91,000. Employment among small-size businesses, defined as those with fewer than 50 workers, declined 25,000. This is the first outright decline in small business employment reported by the ADP Report since November of 2002, and the largest percentage decline since the economy was emerging from recession in early 2002.”

The recession is now enveloping small businesses.  This is a most ominous sign.  It should be born in mind that the ADP report usually reports numbers that are not as severe as numbers that the Department of Labor will issue later this week.

Not surprisingly manufacturing lost 85,000 jobs during the month.  This was the 26th consecutive monthly decline for the sector.

The full ADP Employment report can be accessed here.

President elect Obama will have a tough row to hoe.  The revival of the economy will be a prolonged and difficult effort requiring patience and careful attention to undo three decades of erosion to the countries industrial infrastructure.  Sum2 advocates The Hamilton Plan as a recovery program for the economy and SME manufactures.

Music Video: Bruce Springsteen, Pay Me My Money Down

Risk: recession, industrial capacity, unemployment

November 7, 2008 Posted by | folk, manufacturing, recession, unemployment | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

SME Development Bank

Over the Labor Day Weekend Sum2 announced The Hamilton Plan. The Hamilton Plan is a ten point program to foster the development of manufacturing in the United States by tapping the entrepreneurial energy of small and mid-size enterprises (SME). The plan’s 10 points address sustainable business models, GRC best practices, capital formation initiatives, SME banking, labor union stakeholder empowerment, association syndication, cooperative formation, support for public education and cooperative learning.

This is an introduction to The Hamilton Plan, why it’s needed and the call for the creation of an SME Development Bank (SDB) to facilitate capital formation to achieve the goals of the program.

The Hamilton Plan, named after the first Secretary of the Treasury of the United States, proposes a ten point program to develop small and mid-size enterprise (SME) manufactures. The Hamilton Plan invites business owners and executives, industry associations, chambers of commerce, banks, capital market participants, labor unions, academia, non-profit organizations and governmental institutions to join forces in a concerted effort to support the reestablishment of the manufacturing infrastructure of the United States.

The vital national interest can be served by institutions representing business, labor, local communities and government to join together to foster optimal conditions to incubate and develop SME manufactures. SMEs are a natural strength of the US economy. SME represent largest most vibrant sector of the economy and by combining the entrepreneurial drive and creative energy of SME’s with the pressing need for innovative manufactures; America can reestablish its ascendancy as a preeminent power in the global economy. The Hamilton Plan is designed to provide incentives and encourage the formation of support clusters to develop SME manufacturing.

The Hamilton Plan:

1. Adoption of World Business Council Standards for Sustainable Business

2. Establish Incubators for Targeted Growth Industries

3. Adopt Sound Governance, Risk, Compliance Practices (GRC)

4. Formation of SME Development Bank / Capital Formation Initiatives

5. Partnership Lyceums for Government / Business / Academic Institutions

6. Labor Unions as Preferred Stakeholder / Association Syndication Unions

7. Establish Cooperatives for Technology / Licensing / Commodities / Energy

8. Superfund for Progressive Tax Code / Universal Health & Benefits

Infrastructure Investment / Brownfield Remediation and Reclamation

9. Expand Public Education Funding & SME COOP Program

10. Support Millennium Development Goals

Capital Formation Key to Success

The Hamilton Plan in its entirety is designed to respond to the compounding economic and political crisis that is confronting the United States. The credit crisis, energy dependence, industrial stasis, trade deficits, geo-political instabilities, aging infrastructure and climate change are the result of long term systemic problems that government and industry has failed to address effectively. The Hamilton Plan advocates the adoption of the program to squarely address these pressing issues with the full understanding that it will require the concerted cooperation of all stakeholders to assure the continued development, security and prosperity of America.

The Hamilton Plan requires concerted focus of investment capital to fund development and to make sure that assets are allocated to channels that will assure optimal returns and that equity participation of stakeholders is protected and rewarded. The establishment of an SME Development Bank (SDB) is a structured investment vehicle and corporate institution that will focus, manage and administer capital formation initiatives to incubate and develop SME manufactures.

At its core, The Hamilton Plan seeks to preserve the free flow of investment capital to finance national economic development and empower SME manufactures. The Hamilton Plan is not a substitution nor in any way seeks to supplant the American free market system. The Plan is designed to unleash, pool and focus investment capital. The Plan leverages regulatory capital, compliance and governance. The Plan seeks to achieve strategic economic goals, build wealth and prosperity in US and realize broader goals and objectives to assure sustainable economic growth, nurture innovation,  ecological balance and global competitiveness.

SME Development Bank (SDB)

The SDB would be chartered to assure that capital is deployed to meet appropriate program projects and assure effective stewardship of shareholders capital. The SDB would be the repository for economic and regulatory capital. It would maintain capital adequacy ratios in conformance with Basel II directives. The SDB would serve as a fiduciary to distribute capital through local community banking channels. SDB governance would assure that program objectives, ownership equity, credit requirements, capital allocations, shareholder rights and income distributions are made to SDB shareholders.

Government funding of the SDB would consist of share purchases financed by capital from a national development Superfund. The Superfund would receive tax receipts from a progressive national tax program, budget allocations, licensing and royalty receipts, dividend reinvestment’s and capital gains proceeds from the sale of assets.

Shareholders in the SDB would be community banks, institutional fund managers, state/local/federal government, private equity firms, business owners, company management, associations, labor unions, employees, academic institutions, non-profits organizations. Different forms of capital would be recognized and used to purchase shares in the SDB. For example, local governments can purchase shares in the SDB with tax credits or land grants or infrastructure improvement projects; labor can purchase shares with sweat equity, academic institutions with intellectual capital etc.

Securitization of SDB shares can be created to trade on public exchanges. Any secondary market listings would occur after underlying assets have been properly seasoned. Shares in the SDB would offer terms of extended time frames for investment lockup and share redemption.

Community Bankers as Risk Managers and Distribution Conduits

Community Banks have a critical role as an SDB equity partner. The community bank is the primary channel by which equity and credit capital is provided to the SME. They are front line risk managers and advisors for portfolio companies. Community banks are astute relationship managers. Community banks understand local market conditions and can link assets and service providers to build support clusters and expanded value chains for SMEs. Community bankers will help SMEs focus on capital allocation strategies and support efforts in encourage growth and profitability.

They will provide help in the following areas:

Corporate Governance
Risk Management
Business Promotion, Acceleration and Development
Corporate Advisory Services
Information Services
Performance Evaluation Services

Community banks will be offered regulatory capital relief through its equity participation in the SDB. Community banks will form a joint back office (JBO) to address regulatory capital requirements for its participation and share ownership in the SDB. Community banks must continue fulfill capital requirements for retail banking and other lines of business in accordance with regulatory requirements of its governing agency. State regulatory agencies relating to SME banking regulation, enforcement and inspection would conform to a unified national banking regulatory agency.

Community banks will share in the equity appreciation of the SME and any distributions, dividends or corporate actions the Board of the SDB effects. The differentiation of credit and equity capital participation will be accounted for at the SDB level. Administrators for hedge funds and other Alternative Investment Vehicles have developed sophisticated partnership and shareholding accounting capabilities that can address questions of share class ownership, tranche construction and attributes, asset valuation, distributions and returns.

The community bank in working in conjunction with the SDB will help SME’s effectively manage risk, improve stakeholder communication, implement effective corporate governance that create sustainable business practices to assure long term profitability and growth.

The Hamilton Plan lays the foundation for SMEs to seize market opportunities. SMEs in partnership with community bankers must assess products and markets, business functions and critical success factors. Sufficiently capitalized by the SDB, the SME and local bankers will execute an action plan to support the corporate mission in line with the larger goals of The Hamilton Plan to build wealth for its shareholders and assure the future prosperity of America.

Song: Average White Band: Work To Do

Risk: manufacturing, small and mid-size business, global competitiveness, middle class, national prosperity

September 3, 2008 Posted by | Hamilton Plan, hedge funds, manufacturing, Millennium Development Goals, pop, recession, SME | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Hamilton Plan: Reindustrialization of America

Photograph By Anthony Augustine



Sum2 Announces

The Hamilton Plan:

A Ten Point Program to Develop

Small and Mid-Size Enterprise (SME) Manufactures

Great Falls Festival

Paterson NJ, Labor Day 2008

Sum2 is proud to be participating again in this year’s historic Great Falls Festival and is pleased to announce The Hamilton Plan, a ten point program to develop small and mid-size enterprise (SME) manufactures. The Paterson Great Falls Festival is the perfect opportunity for Sum2 to invite business owners and executives, industry associations, chambers of commerce, banks, capital market participants, labor unions, academia, non-profit organizations and governmental institutions to join forces in a concerted effort to support the reestablishment of the manufacturing infrastructure of the United States.

“Many of the economic, political and cultural challenges confronting the United States can be traced back to the dismantling of our industrial and manufacturing base” stated James McCallum President of Sum2. “Since the 1980’s America’s economic infrastructure has dramatically changed. The evolution of our economy to service oriented businesses has seriously eroded the manufacturing capabilities and industrial capacity of our country. This has produced a decline of higher wage paying jobs, the disincentive to develop innovative manufacturing methods and practices, deteriorating support infrastructure and the impairment of ancillary support businesses.

It’s in the vital national interest for institutions representing business, labor, communities and government cooperate to foster optimal conditions to incubate and develop SME manufactures. The SME segment is the largest most vibrant sector of our economy and by combining the entrepreneurial drive and creative energy of SME’s with our pressing need for innovative manufactures; America can reestablish its ascendancy as a preeminent power in the global economy. Sum2’s Hamilton Plan is designed to encourage the formation of support clusters to develop SME manufacturing.

The Hamilton Plan

1. WBC Standards for Sustainable Business Model
2. Establish Incubators for Targeted Growth Industries
3. Adopt Sound Governance, Risk, Compliance Practices (GRC)
4. Form SME Development Bank / Private Equity Capital Formation Initiatives
5. Partnership Lyceums for Government / Business / Academic Institutions
6. Labor Unions as Preferred Stakeholder / Association Syndication Unions
7. Establish Cooperatives for Technology / Licensing / Commodity / Energy
8. Superfund for Progressive Tax Code / Universal Health & Benefits /
Infrastructure / Brownfield Remediation and Reclamation
9. Expand Public Education Funding & SME COOP Program
10. Support Millennium Development Goals

Historical Significance of Paterson’s Great Falls

Paterson’s Great Falls Festival is an ideal venue to announce the Hamilton Plan. The Friends of the Great Falls website writes that in 1791, Alexander Hamilton and a group of investors created the S.U.M., the Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures, to harness the tremendous power of the Passaic Great Falls. It was the boldest private enterprise ever conceived in the early days of the United States. Hamilton envisioned an industrialized America and the creation of this raceway system was his ambitious example of how corporations could be organized to develop manufacturing on a large scale. With this enterprise, along with the law, finance and incentives he put in place as the nation’s first Secretary of the Treasurer, Hamilton forged the basis of American capitalism. The planned industrialization of this historic place is the realization of the Hamiltonian vision of an industrialized America. This is truly a founding father’s site.

Sum2 Sound Practice Thought Leader

Sum2’s announcement of the Hamilton Plan is in response to the compounding economic and political crisis that is confronting the United States. The credit and energy crisis, inflation pressures, trade deficits, geo-political instabilities, global warming and ecological degradation are the result of long term systemic problems that government and industry has failed to address effectively. Sum2 advocates the adoption of the program to squarely address these pressing issues with the full understanding that it will require the concerted cooperation of all stakeholders to assure the continued development, security and prosperity of America.

Sum2 offers a series of products and services to help SME’s effectively manage risk, improve stakeholder communication, implement effective corporate governance that create sustainable business practices to assure long term profitability and growth.

At last years Great Falls Festival, Sum2 announced its new product series the SMB|360°. Since that announcement the series has expended to include, the Profit|Optimizer and a soon to be announced premium product that that will expand the breath and depth of the SMB|360° product series.

The Profit|Optimizer is a qualitative risk assessment and opportunity discover tool. It assists SME’s to identify and score business vulnerabilities and opportunities. The Profit|Optimizer conducts over 200 assessments encompassing products and markets, business functions and critical success factors. The Profit|Optimizer aggregates assessment scores and presents initiatives on a series of dashboards that allows business managers to decide what action items mitigates the greatest risk and produces the greatest return. Managers can make informed capital allocation decisions to build profitability and maintain business growth.

The Profit|Optimizer demonstrates to shareholders, bankers and other stakeholders that company management are effective risk managers that are committed to practicing corporate governance excellence.

Sum2 also offers the award winning PACO™ (Patriot Act Compliance Officer). PACO™ helps financial services companies comply with the anti-money laundering provision of the Patriot Act.

About Sum2

Sum2 was founded in 2002 to promote the commercial application of sound practice programs. Sum2’s sound practice program addresses risk management, corporate governance, shareholder communications and regulatory compliance. Sum2’s objective is to assist businesses and industries to implement corporate sound practices that add exponential value for stakeholders, employees, customers and to be exemplary citizens within the communities in which they operate and serve.

Sum2 manufactures, aggregates, packages and distributes innovative digital data content products to selected channels and markets.

Music: Billy Joels Allentown

Risk: unemployment, urban decay, global competitiveness, national security, protection of middle class

August 30, 2008 Posted by | Hamilton Plan, manufacturing, pop, recession, SME, Sum2 | , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Macroeconomic Risk Impacts SMEs

Small and mid-size enterprises (SME) are acutely susceptible to the negative impact of macroeconomic risk factors. Macroeconomic risk factors such as inflation, interest rates, market cycles, market regionalism, credit and labor availability, and fuel costs conspire to drain profitability and financial health of small and mid-size businesses.

Though issues of scale are principal culprits that enhance the negative impact of macroeconomic factors on SME’s, other factors such as risk concentration in product markets, clients, and supply chain; silo business functions and lack of specialized treasury functions to hedge risk and maximize capital allocation returns also contribute to enhanced macroeconomic risk profile of SME’s.

To help SME’s to better understand and manage the impact of macroeconomic risk factors on their business; Sum2 is providing the Profit|Optimizer Macroeconomic Test to small business owners and managers at no charge. The test is a module from the Profit|Optimizer product which provides a thorough risk assessment and opportunity discovery review of a small business enterprise.

The test can be accessed by clicking this Profit|Optimizer hyper link.

We hope to be of service. Take the test.

You Tube Video: Charley Brown

Risk: SME, Macroeconomic Risk, Inflation, CRG, Risk Management

May 31, 2008 Posted by | risk management, SME, Sum2 | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Rebuilding America’s Manufacturing with Better Process

Sum2 recently participated in a Podcast sponsored by Better Process Podcast. The subject of the podcast was GRC for SMEs.

Better Process Podcast discusses news and market events that address manufacturing issues. The topics range from US manufacturing, China competition, RFID, lean manufacturing, and manufacturing technology.

Better Process podcasts was founded by Ken Rayment. Ken is a Black Belt Six Sigma guy who has a passion for his work and is deeply commited to the development and revitalization of manufacturing in the United States.

Sum2 caught Ken’s attention through a press release we issued offering free access to the Profit|Optimizers macroeconomic risk module. Though Sum2’s market focus is small and midsize businesses we are heartened and honored to participate in the Bettter Process podcast series.

Sum2 takes its name from the Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures (S.U.M.), S.U.M. was founded by Alexander Hamilton in 1793. The purpose of S.U.M was to promote useful manufacturing by using the waterpower generated by the Great Falls. S.U.M was the first planned industrial city in North America and should rightly be considered the cradle of industrial capitalism in North America. The area of S.U.M.’s founding was later incorporated as the City of Paterson New Jersey, which would grow to become a major industrial center from the 1800’s through World War 2. Paterson was a key munitions, textile and locomotive manufacture center during the Civil War and thus played a pivotal role in helping preserve Alexander Hamilton’s conception of a Federalist Union of States.

Though the landscape of industrial capitalism has changed during the Information Age, Sum2 was founded to continue the useful and visionary work of the original S.U.M. Sum2 recognizes the strategic importance of manufacturing and will seek to build our business by creating proprietary content, ASP delivery capabilities and mission critical software to implement corporate sound practices for our clients as they seek to create value in the digital economy.

Podcast: Better Process, Sum2 GRC

Risk: Manufacturing, Capital Formation, Podcasting, Profit|Optimizer, Sum2, Six Sigma, SMB Risk Management

May 13, 2008 Posted by | commerce, manufacturing, SME, Sum2 | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Capital Formation for SMB’s

CFO magazine ran an interesting but brief article on SEC plan to encourage and assist capital formation for small mid-size businesses (SMB’s).

In light of all the gyrations in the credit markets and the rush to aid investment and money center banks (see Risk Rap Post 4/10/08, SMB’s TBTF), it is heartening to know that the capital needs of our country’s most important economic sector is not being over looked by the government regulatory bodies.

The access to capital is critical for small businesses. The SEC plan to expand capital access to the segment will help SMBs cope with stringent credit policies, the effects of the economic downturn and the pressure on asset valuations due to the falling real estate and public equity markets.

An interesting side light to this initiative will be how community banks and private equity firms position themselves to take advantage of this SEC initiative. It bears watching and this could be an important program to align the interests of cash rich private equity firms and capital stressed community banks.

We’ll post more on this subject in the future.

Risk: SMB, Regulatory, Private Equity, Community Banks, Market, Credit

May 10, 2008 Posted by | banking, credit crisis, hedge funds, private equity, SME | , , , , , , | Leave a comment